Author - Antara-Project

Annemarie Borg FRSA

I am delighted and honoured to have been made a Fellow of The Royal Society of Arts. RSA

I am looking forward to connecting with the Fellows network and the research programmes which encourage creativity and Arts in our Society and our Education system. I will endeavour to be in close contact via the Antara Project and in person with groups and forums that help to raise awareness about Climate Change and its consequences, as well as sharing my concerns about Ocean Preservation and Animal Rights around the world.

Thank you again.
Annemarie Borg

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Performance coach in UK & EU

Annemarie Borg

Performance Coach United Kingdom, Europe, USA

Individual coaching and group workshops for actors, singers and artists in general.
Working on:
  • repertoire
  • pronunciation (various languages) and diction
  • performance preparation
  • personalised interpretation
  • stage fright
  • stage presence
  • audition preparation
Contact Annemarie Here for more information.
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Annemarie Borg “In Nomine Tellus” CD

After self-released “In Nomine Cetus” CD (June 2014 on Antara Project), French/Swedish soundpainter (poet, lyricist, singer, environmentalist, educator…) Annemarie Borg, based in London, returns with the second part of the trilogy, entitled “In Nomine Tellus” and released on Swedish gterma label during February 2018. The album is packaged in catchy 6-panel disc eco wallet featuring panoramic photography and visual art by the artist herself with the additional design by gterma’s Johan Rehn. The mastering credit, as usual with all gterma releases, goes to A.P of Ghost Sounds.
As described in the liner notes, “In Nomine Tellus” is a Tone Poem of our time in three parts. 8-plus minutes long “Quiet Storm Phase One” and 17-minute “Earth Lament” comprise the first part. Intangibly desolate drone rumbles coalesce with poignantly crescendoing and meandering cinematic piquancy before inconspicuously transmuting into monochromatically gargantuan hums softened by tiding organic tapestries. Balmily enveloping, yet monumentally majestic! Thus the title “Quiet Storm Phase One” is precisely displayed. Whale sounds and roars, field recordings, noises and Annemarie’s expressive chants announce “Earth Lament”, while backed by quietly droning expansive horizons. Stringed anxiousness arise here and there. After 8 minutes the scenario shifts into profoundly embracing orchestral sadness, which later metamorphoses into slightly calmer sceneries juxtaposed by persistently craving cascades. A very powerful sonic statement indeed! Second part counts three compositions, “Quiet Storm Phase Two”, “Masau’u” and “Avahana Timi”. The first one, “Quiet Storm Phase Two” keeps on rather tranquil route, although pervaded by gently escalating feel before evanescing through helixing quietudes. 16 minutes long “Masau’u” immerses the listener into contemplatively gliding panoptic realms meticulously reinforced by Annemarie’s exquisite vocal artistry. Aural nectar is served here!!! “Avahana Timi” amalgamates perplexing grumbles, whale calls and seashore symphony with Annemarie chanting Gayatri Mantra. The closing part includes two tracks, “Quiet Storm Phase Three” and “Pace”. Emotive yearning motifs of “Quiet Storm Phase Three” delve into unfathomable depths, while sinuous patterns keep on illuminating and seek for the vestige of guidance. The closing composition “Pace” brings to the stage cello mastery of Patrick Tapio Johnson, who has already contributed to Annemarie’s album “Iridescent Perceptions” (2012). Weeping cello curtains gorgeously commingle with evocative piano notes and tranquilly embracing location recordings. A very touching epilogue, where mournful vistas are opposed by captivating blankets of hope…
Although deep listening sessions unveiled several, mostly inaudible, glitch errors on “Earth Lament”, the sound quality is for sure satisfying and especially the use of quality headphones offers a fully rewarding journey. Nearly 75 minutes long “In Nomine Tellus” is a really strong album, hauntingly sonorous and immensely engrossing. And just the same as with its predecessor “In Nomine Cetus”, this sonic installment manifests intense messages for all of us, the whole mankind about the future of our Earth. It’s a global issue, it’s still not too late, but the countdown is certainly on… That’s “In Nomine Tellus” by Annemarie Borg, feel free to explore it, enjoy it, contribute and make the difference!!!
Richard Gürtler (Nov 21, 2018, Bratislava, Slovakia)

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Philip Wells (the firepoet)

(http://www.thefirepoet.com/)
“We have come not to shout, but to listen;
Not to hoard, but to share;
Not to lash out, but to calm;
Not to cover up, but to lay bare.
We have come not to suffocate, but to touch;
Not to dictate, but to understand;
Not to hold back, but to unleash-
Not to shrink, but to expand.
We have come not to shadow, but to colour;
Not to conquer, but to embrace;
Not for ourselves, but for others-
Not to silence, but to give voice.”

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Annemarie Borg

“For centuries, we humans have been gradually destroying the very balance of Life on earth as if this was our right. As a result, today our needs exceed Nature’s reserves. These needs as we call them are nothing we can be proud of when 20% of the world’s population consume 80% of its resources and 5000 people a day die from lack of clean water. It also must be obvious that no needs or concepts of “life style” justify the vicious slaughter of animals for skin/fur and other idiotic products relished by our society! They are tortured in the name of vanity, ignorance, as we create a nonsense market that others less fortunate are tempted to exploit. The fact is that the society we have built based on such superficial concepts, blind to the consequences, deserves the fate our scientists predict. It is hard to admit but true, that today the world would be a far better place without us. And if that is not convincing enough because we have lost track of our responsibilities, let’s remember we are by many of our actions biting off the hand that feeds us. Our survival on earth depends on us respecting its balance. We can take that road, we may still have some choices, and on these depend our fate and the possibility to bring this extraordinary World Into Remission.”

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Martin Powell (Poet and Environmentalist)

(http://martinpowellpoetry.blogspot.com
/2009/07/global-warning.html)

Global warning

“Tsunamis sweeping across the deep seas
Hurricanes howling with deafening breeze
Earthquakes shaking our tectonic plates
Volcanoes erupting round Earth as it breaks

Dinosaurs died and alowed man to stand
Millions of years changed the face of the land
A new world was born and with life it did flourish
Enough natural resources to keep us all nourished

For a long time the man and the Earth were as one
We drank from its rivers, bathed in light from the sun
The soil was rich, and ideal for seeds
The planet attended to all of our needs

But Earth for its pleasures could not comprehend
The mentality of its so newly found friend
We used and consumed without fear, or care
We scarred and we butchered a beauty so rare

Poisoning oceans and chopping down trees
Relaying landscapes to build as we pleased
Taking for granted our grand evolution
Seeds that were planted replaced by pollution

Have you not wondered why its so called “mother” earth?
Throughout all of history it has given birth!
This bluish green ball gently floating through space
Has potential for life quite like no other place

It gives and it gives and has nothing to ask
To treat it with love and repect is our task
For the moment the future we cant comprehend
Is the world that we know will soon come to an end

But there is still some time to undo whats been done
Requiring our species to all act as one
With wind turbines turning and running on air
Solar panels sourcing our suns constant glare

We could cut our emissions and clean up with care
Make it our mission to heal and repair
Salvage and save for all that its worth
Secure our existence as people of Earth”

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Rainer Dimmler (Composer and Poet)

Weint meine Brüder, weint,
die Tage die wir zählen sind kalt.
Kein Gott uns mehr erscheint
und wir sind traurig und alt.
Verlorene Kinder sind wir geblieben,
unsere Herzen sind verschlossen.
Und ohne jemals aufrecht zu lieben,
folgen wir tobenden Wirtschaftsbossen.
Doch sehet ich träume noch immer,
der große Geist sei uns erschienen,
in einem großen weißen Zimmer,
da wo wir lieben und dienen.
Und mein Herz singt immer wieder,
von Elfen und Feen begleitet:
alle Menschen werden Lieder
in Liebe und Licht gekleidet.
Betet, dass uns ein Engel erscheint,
denn diesmal sind wir alle gemeint.
Weint meine Brüder, weint.

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Keith Farnish

“Waking After The Fall

The deepest red,
Crosshatched with sleep;
The drowse like a heavy quilt.
A warm pulse and a twitch,
Then a hand
Upon my arm.

The merest glint:
Stars and stripes of light;
Empires of memory lie undisturbed.
What was there then?
Though now
We have this.

A stealthy shift;
Patting feet on clay,
Carefree with youth, not careworn.
Take me forward,
Not back,
Not ever”

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Antony Gormley – The guardian 13 02 2010

“There is a strong connection between the urge for survival and the art of a people and a time. We have a task in hand. Culture in the developed western world has always positioned itself in distinction to nature: now we have to discover our nature within nature.”
“But it is also my responsibility to make sure that I can deal with my own impacts, including the carbon footprint of the studio and all its activities. I have had the carbon footprint of the studio assessed and minimised my flights; the studio is insulated, and we will install solar panels on the roof (it is wide and relatively flat). We must recycle more of our materials and investigate the viability of a wind turbine. I must also decide whether carbon offsetting is a conscience salver or a real benefit.
Having done all of this, my greatest responsibility is to make work in the most direct way that I can, and interpret this time and place in a way that makes people more aware of themselves and it.”

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